Ashraf El Fiky, MBBCH(MD), PhD

Ashraf El Fiky, MBBCH(MD), PhD

Medical Officer, Emmes

Dr. El Fiky is a Harvard-trained and educated clinical research expert and is currently is a full-time Medical Officer at a global regulatory and clinical research consulting firm, EMMES, headquartered in the Washington DC metropolitan region. His duties include medical monitoring, phramacovigilance, drug risk assessment/mitigation and regulatory oversight of clinical trials assessing safety and efficacy of novel drugs, vaccines and stem cell therapies. Dr. El Fiky received his medical degree from Egypt’s University of Alexandria and Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology/Immunology from the University of California-Irvine. His clinical training specialized in infection control and laboratory medicine particularly molecular identification of virulence factors of endemic vector- and blood-borne pathogens. Dr. El Fiky’s PhD thesis and postdoctoral research revealed a novel signaling mechanism for type I interferon and investigated molecular signaling mechanism of cytokines in cancer, inflammation, and allergic pathogenesis. After completing his medical training and ABMM- approved fellowship, he continued postdoctoral training at the NIH’s National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the FDA’s Office of Vaccine Research and Review. He completed his clinical trial training at Harvard Medical School. Dr. El Fiky co-authored peer-reviewed novel research publications in addition to a book chapter on clinical and regulatory pathway of stem cell-based therapy in the United States. Dr. El Fiky was awarded Harvard University’s clinical research scholarship, the FDA’s Commissioner Citation Award and the University of California’s William Holcomb Award for Excellence in Biomedical Research. Dr. El Fiky gave a lecture at the 2017 and the 2019 TERMIS meetings in Charlotte, NC and Orlando, FL, respectively, on the regulatory pathway for mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapy in the United States focusing on the NIH’s Production Assistance for Cell Therapy (PACT) program.