David Williams, DSc

David Williams, DSc

Professor and Director of International Affairs, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Professor Williams has had 50 years experience in biomaterials, medical device and tissue engineering. During his career he has published over 35 books and 430 papers: his latest book, Essential Biomaterials Science was published by Cambridge University Press in 2014. He was Editor-in-Chief of Biomaterials, the world’s leading journal in this field for 15 years. He has received the major awards from the US, European and Indian societies of biomaterials including the Founders Award of the US Society for Biomaterials in 2007, and received the prestigious Acta Biomaterialia Gold Medal in 2012. In 1999 he was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, UK, and is a Foreign Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, all in recognition of his contributions to engineering in medicine. He was global President of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society between 2012 and 2015.

Professor Williams left the University of Liverpool, UK, in 2007, where he had been Head of Clinical Engineering, Director of the UK Centre for Tissue Engineering and Pro Vice Chancellor of the University. While retaining the title of Emeritus Professor at Liverpool, he is currently Professor and Director of International Affairs, Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, North Carolina, USA. In addition, he is a Visiting Professor in the Christiaan Barnard Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cape Town, South Africa, a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, University of New South Wales, Australia, and a Guest Professor, at Tsinghua Universities, Beijing, and Advisory Professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. . In Cape Town, along with Professor Peter Zilla, the current Chris Barnard Professor of Surgery, he formed a company that will produce low cost but high technology medical devices that can be used with minimally invasive procedures to treat young adults in sub-Sarah Africa, who currently have no therapies available to them.  After 8 years work, and raising the equivalent of $30 million within Africa, his team successfully used their non-occlusive delivery system in a First-in-Man experience in January 2019, the first in the world.